Here’s what we know about alcohol & pregnancy

“This infographic provides an overview of what we know about alcohol and pregnancy and the kinds of support women deserve. It was developed with support from Canada FASD Research Network and its Prevention Network Action Team with a goal of promoting engagement between women, partners, providers and communities.”
By Centre of Excellence for Women’s Health (Canada, 2017)

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A Conversation Worth Having

“The Campus & Community Coalition has joined together with its partners, Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools, the Town of Chapel Hill, and the Orange County Health Department to highlight a conversation worth having. Our team has pulled together the leading research on alcohol’s impacts on the underage brain to bring resources to families in our community so that they can start a conversation about adolescent substance use. We cover why families should be talking with their children about alcohol, how they can start the conversation, and how mental health and social media influence underage alcohol use. Our hope is that the community will build on the strength of its connections to start conversations within and among families.”

Read more from Chapel Hill Downtown Partnership

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Wise parent

“Thank you, mother!” and “Thank you, father!” are clips from the Wise Parent campaign, run by National Insitute for Health Development and Ministry of the Interior. (Estonia, 2016).

These clips show the gratitude that a child has for his/her parents who have always been supportive and who also directs a child to achieve goals even when it´s hard (not to fall our from music school or spend endless hours behind a computer screen). Also, a child thanks that they explained them the consequences of alcohol so that now, they can do what they have always dreamt of.


notMYkid


“The challenges kids and families face today are complex and have the potential to devastate lives and derail futures. It is extremely important to work together to protect the kids in our community. The average age a kid will first try drugs is 13. Studies indicate that people who reach 21 without engaging in destructive behaviors are likely to never do so, which is why we passionately educate about current trends, warning signs, and the long-term impact of destructive behaviors. We believe proactive prevention on the part of kids, families, and communities is the answer to long-term success.”

“Every kid will have the knowledge and confidence to reach their full potential through making positive life choices.”

Read more from notMYkid

Too Young To Drink 2017

The network of partner organizations has now exceeded 80 organizations in 36 countries around the world, working together to raise awareness of FASD internationally.
In its previous three editions (2014, 2015, and 2016), the campaign was based on the concept, created by Fabrica, the Benetton group’s communication research center, of a baby inside an alcoholic drink (baby in bottles, 2014, and “baby cocktail”, 2015 and 2016). This year, a new visual component was developed. It consists of a drawing, which was created by the Italian artist, art director, satirical author, Beppe Mora.
The campaign is coordinated by the Local Health Authority no.2 “Marca Trevigiana” (Veneto Region, Italy), which offered consultancy for the social marketing strategy and evaluation, basing on the experience of the project “Mamma Beve Bimbo Beve.”

For further information: www.tooyoungtodrink.org

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Talk it out

Your kids may already be more aware of alcohol than you think. And they’re almost certainly ready to hear what you have to say. Start your conversations now. And stop underage drinking in your family.

Underage drinking in North Carolina starts earlier, and comes with higher costs, than we imagine. Not just dollars and cents, but lives lost, futures irrevocably altered, brains forever impaired — all of the physical, social and emotional damage that can weigh down tweens and teenagers for the rest of their lives.

Your kids may already be more aware of alcohol than you think. And they’re almost certainly ready to hear what you have to say.”

Read more from http://www.talkitoutnc.org